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Category Archives: Friday’s Farm Fact

Boosting Your Plants’ Health Without Chemicals

If you’re like most farmers and gardeners, your plants could probably use an extra boost from time to time. Instead of relying on chemical fertilizers that take their toll on the environment and your health, you can easily find natural and organic fertilizers that work just as well (without any of those pesky side effects). […]

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Keeping Soil Where it Belongs on Organic Farms

Not only is the loss of topsoil to erosion a worldwide environmental issue, but it can also result in hefty fines from city and state departments. On organic farms, soil erosion is simply the gradual process of wind, water, and environmental factors deteriorating the land. It often becomes a catch 22 when farmers cause their […]

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Mulch: The Organic Farmer’s Best Friend

Regardless if you’re growing a tiny backyard garden or operating a large-scale organic farm, mulch should be one of your very best friends. Not only do mulches help keep pesky weeds at bay, but they also can help prevent disease, enrich the soil with organic matter, conserve moisture, and maintain soil temperature. Besides, mulch makes […]

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Friday Farm Fact: Many Organic Foods Contain Non-organic Food Ingredients

So you’ve committed to buying organic food whenever you can…that’s great! But did you know that many processed foods that are labeled as “organic” actually contain non-organic ingredients? Organizations like the Soil Association Certification dictate that at least 95% of the ingredients in foods labeled as “organic” must come from organically-produced animals and plants. But […]

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Friday’s Farm Fact – GMO: The Dirtiest Word in Agriculture

GMO might only be three letters, but it’s become the latest dirty word in many people’s vocabulary. GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, have infiltrated much of the food supply in the United States and they’re harder to avoid than you’d think. Genetic engineering has become standard practice on many agricultural farms, meaning that the foods […]

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Friday’s Farm Fact – Urban Farming: Not Just an Urban Legend

There are at least 61,777 residential and community gardens that are part of the “urban farming global food chain.” Urban farming is doing more than just providing city folk with a way to grow their own salads. Today’s version of urban farming establishes organic gardens in vacant lots and unused spaces to grow crops for […]

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Fridays’ Farm Fact – Crop Rotation is Essential to Organic Farming

Whether you’re running large-scale organic farm or growing a tiny organic garden in your backyard, everything seems to revolve around crop rotation. Believe it or not, crop rotation is more than just switching out what you plant from year to year. Crop rotation is a systematic approach to deciding which plants will thrive best in […]

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Friday’s Farm Fact

Did you know: “Before World War II, all crops were organic. It was only afterward that farms used new, synthetic pesticides and chemicals to minimize weed, insects, and rodent damage.” Posted in Reader’s Digest, read more here.

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Friday’s Farm Fact

Did you think that growing vegetables organically is easy? The soil is healthy, the plants are strong and the fertilizer is pure and nutritious. However, the hard work on an organic farm is controlling weeds without the use of  herbicides.  Monsanto and friends are not allowed to visit.  The result is that the weeds are […]

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Friday’s Farm Fact

Did you know that there are not many places left in North America where you can run a farm and not have any neighbors around you. The Seagate farms use well water that flows underground directly from the Sierra mountains 25 miles away. There are no neighboring farms, which eliminates the chance of farm chemicals […]

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